Jason and Amy Mansfield, a pair of documentary filmmakers, were in Gurdon last week to study the legend of the Gurdon Light.

Jason and Amy Mansfield, a pair of documentary filmmakers, were in Gurdon last week to study the legend of the Gurdon Light.
The project is part of a feature that will focus on three Arkansas-based tales, with the other two being the Fouke Monster and the White River Monster. Upon completion, the Mansfields will submit the film to PBS for a possible October viewing.
In order to decide the three subjects to be documented, an art contest was held at Mountain Home Schools. Abby Walden, a Mountain Home resident, co-won with a painting of the Gurdon Light legend, thus qualifying the story.
The Mansfields are from North Central Arkansas. Possessing a love of folklore, they are staying busy with their work.
“Amy keeps me focused,” said Jason Mansfield. “I’m working on three projects and she is writing a fourth now.”
While visiting, the Mansfields filmed footage of the mural featuring the headless man with the lantern, the local storefront that shares details of the murder, and the actual trail. They also interviewed locals Russell Butler, who is retired from the railroad, and Chance Russell, both of whom have seen the light many times and shared their experiences. Gurdon Mayor Sherry Kelley was also interviewed on the specifics of crime itself. She is also being credited as a field producer.
“I really enjoyed working with the Mansfields,” said Kelley. “Russell and Chance did a great job on-camera.”
Kelley shared that if the film is accepted to air on PBS, then she will try to arrange a public viewing to be held at The Market On Main.