Clark County resident Kolby Harper has been involved in law for a few years now; paying her dues both at the prosecutor’s office and in school.

Clark County resident Kolby Harper has been involved in law for a few years now; paying her dues both at the prosecutor’s office and in school.
That work has paid off and on April 5, she was sworn in as deputy prosecutor.
A native and resident of Gurdon, Harper has built up a strong network who helped her along the way.
“My support system with my friends and family has been great,” said Harper.
Graduating in 2005, Harper enrolled at Ouachita Baptist University where she originally majored in political science and Spanish, with a minor in French. Her time at Ouachita set her on the path to becoming a lawyer.
“When we started talking a little about the law in our classes, I just got into that," said Harper.
She eventually enrolled at the University of Arkansas School of Law in Fayetteville. While still in college, Harper served as an intern at the prosecutor’s office. She would return to the office every Christmas and summer to continue her work. From there, she began to work part-time.
Harper graduated from law school in 2015. During her time at the local prosecutor's office, her duties have included restitution recovery, observing and reporting the courts, domestic violence cases, coordinating and doing affidavits for district court.
“Kolby’s just been a very hard worker for us,” said Prosecutor Blake Batson.
“She’s very bright and picks things up quickly. When you’re that type of person, you get to do a lot of things. That’s an example of her abilities to adapt and change," said Batson, who added that Harper does not back down from a challenge.
Harper's new position does come with just more responsibilities, but also a place in the county’s history as she is the first African American to assume the job.
Harper does not take her honor in Clark County history lightly.
“I’m just really grateful for the opportunity,” said Harper.
“I want to do this job to the best of my ability and I want to inspire people to go to law school.”
Despite an intense workload, Harper said she is up to the challenge.
“I actually think there is a lot of pressure, but that is when I work best,” said Harper.