The Magic Flute is a spectacle of sight and sound as the talented OBU student artists treat the audience to one of Mozart’s finest operas. The magnificent Jones Performing Arts Center is the destination for this full, rich theatrical experience.

The play
The Ouachita Baptist University team of Drs. Secrest and Secrest have another masterpiece for the public.
The Magic Flute is a spectacle of sight and sound as the talented OBU student artists treat the audience to one of Mozart’s finest operas. The magnificent Jones Performing Arts Center is the destination for this full, rich theatrical experience.
The story
The story is familiar: good triumphs over evil and the search for true love. Heir Mozart sets the stage in ancient Egypt where Prince Tamino searches for his lady love, Princess Pamina. He is aided by an unwilling sidekick, Papageno. Pamina has been enslaved by the “evil” Sarastro, who is more wise than evil. It is Pamina’s own mother, the Queen of the Night and accomplices; her three ladies and Monostatos who are the true villains. We follow the characters through many adventures and in the end courage and wisdom are victorious over less virtuous traits.
The presentation
The costumes and make-up alone are worth the price of a ticket and when you add in the expertise of the full orchestra in the pit you just can’t miss. However it is the vocalists on stage and the way their voices intertwine that bring the magic to “The Magic Flute.”
The actors
Prince Pamino, Xavier Lagunas, was a delight to the ears, his every note beautiful. The three women; Victoria Mantooth, Meredith Martin and Bethany Swiontek, were a trio of spunky, spitfires. Their chemistry was perfect. Papageno, Joel Rogier, was endearing as a charismatic, comic coward. He was a fine actor as well as singer. Each in this quintet was delightful on their on, but when they sang together the theater goers’ joy increased.
Pamina, Caitlin Secrest, has a beautiful voice. Rachel Harris, The Queen of the Night’s vocals are powerful, and Sarastro, John Tneoh hits some very deep tones. Papagena, Hannah Garner, was the perfect match for Papageno their duet together was a highlight. Monostatos, DeCarl Jones, was a perfectly slimly villain and when he and his evil cohorts are charmed by the magic bells, it was hilarious. The chorus, spirits and priests do a fine job and you can understand every word the cast sings. The directors Dr. Glenda and Dr. Jon Secrest bring the most out of the talent on stage as their voices mingle and meld in the most delightful way.
The times
The show is two and a half hours long including intermission. It runs Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights beginning at 7:30 p.m. and there is a matinee on Sunday at 2:30 p.m.