Police officers from around Clark County experienced the shock of a taser first hand last week. Thirteen officers from Gurdon and Arkadelphia participated in a taser-training class at the Gurdon Municipal Building.

Police officers from around Clark County experienced the shock of a taser first hand last week. Thirteen officers from Gurdon and Arkadelphia participated in a taser-training class at the Gurdon Municipal Building.
The class was designed to give officers the ability to better understand the weapon.
Gurdon police officers, along with some Clark county officers were each given a “drive run” shot from the tasers, with each officer getting a five second charge. “That five seconds feels more like thirty minutes,” said Officer Darrin Cooper. 
According to Cooper, the drive stun causes significant localized pain in the area touched by the taser, but does not have a significant effect on the central nervous system.The drive stun does not incapacitate a subject but may assist in taking a subject into custody. It is also known as "dry tasing," "contact tasing," or "drive tasing."
"I want to know its abilities and limitations, and if I’m going to use it on somebody else, I want to be able to say that I’ve had it too," Gurdon police officer Chris Russell said.
When the taster guns are shot, two barbed, straight fish-hooks fly out. The hooks stick in the body and the taser gun sends 50,000 volts of electricity through the person's body, which completely incapacitates them
Officers say the weapons allow them to better control situations without using deadly force.
“We work a lot by ourselves, so it’s important to be able to protect ourselves without necessarily having to pull our guns,” said Russell.